Sandling Primary School

History Overview

At Sandling Primary School, our history curriculum is designed to inspire pupils through an exploration of the past, which is underpinned by our school PRACTISE values. By learning about historical topics such as the Vikings, the Great Fire of London, World War II and Arctic Explorers, our children become problem solvers and develop resilience by understanding complex historical events and time periods. The adventurous exploits of the Vikings and Arctic Explorers inspire an adventurous spirit, while the innovations of the Egyptians and Greeks highlight creativity. Collaborative projects reflect historical teamwork, fostering teamwork skills, and promoting independence through individual research. Learning about self-assured historical figures instils self-assurance, and exploring diverse perspectives enhances students' esteem.

What our pupils say about their history learning

“I learnt about how I’ve changed. My hair and eyes are a different colour and I am taller. And I now eat more food than when I was a baby’’ – Arthur, Year R
 
“I liked learning about old and new toys. I liked that we got to take old and new toys into school to talk and write about’’ – Betty, Year 1
 
“I really enjoyed learning about the Great Fire of London and writing our own stories about what happened’’ – Charlotte, Year 2
 
“I enjoyed learning about the Stone Age and even meeting a Stone Age person on our school trip!’’ – Thea, Year 3
 
“I thought it was really interesting learning about how the Ancient Egyptians moulded Tutankhamun’s mask without the use of modern materials’’ – George, Year 4
 

“The Vikings learning was really interesting. It was interesting to learn about how they travelled the world spreading their religion. And our Viking Day was fun, I enjoyed cracking the Viking ruin codes’’ – Elliot, Year 5.

 

“I found our transport topic really interesting. We learnt about how transport changed throughout history, and how vehicles used to just be powered by fuel, but can now be powered by electricity’’ – Summer, Year 6.

Progression in History

To ensure that there is progression throughout this ambitious history curriculum, our learning is separated into:

  • Substantive Knowledge

Information about the past in terms of people, events, dates, states of affairs and places.

This is taught through concepts such as Monarchy, Exploration and Empire that pupils revisit throughout their time at Sandling.

  • Disciplinary Knowledge

How historians learn about the past and construct their understanding of it.

This is taught through second-order concepts such as Continuity and Change; and Significance which pupils revisit throughout their time at Sandling.

Concepts

Below is a table of concepts that the children at Sandling Primary School focus upon in history and our reasoning behind their choice.

 

Concept

Why learn about this concept?

Year group and topic studied

Architecture

By learning about architecture within history, children will gain an understanding of the ideas that were important to and shaped past societies. Our children will learn how a building can reveal much about the society that produced it.

Year 2 Castles

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Monarchy

By learning about monarchy, children will be given the opportunity to learn about, and compare, kings, queens and other rulers throughout history and be inspired by these individuals that have changed our world.

 

Year R Festivals and Celebrations

Year 2 Castles

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 4 Maya

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Year 5 Anglo-Saxons

Exploration

By learning about exploration, children will learn about migration, navigation, progress, tools and discovery in history. They will compare how significant explores in the past have changed how we see the world today, and also consider the importance of exploration in today’s world and into the future.

Year 1 Polar Explorer

Year 2 Shipwrecked

Year 5 Romans

Year 5 Vikings

Technology

By learning about technology, children will consider how technology has advanced throughout the past, and importantly the reasons for why it has advanced. Children will learn about the key role that technology has played in the success of many civilisations and empires.

Year R Superheroes

Year R Plants

Year 1 Polar Adventure

Year 1 Toys

Year 6 WW2

Year 6 Local Transport

Invasion

By learning about invasion, children will learn how invasion changes societies and how invasion in Britain shaped the country that we live in today. They will learn important lessons about the causes and consequences of invasion and reflect on more modern warfare and the impact on life more similar to their own.

Year R Festivals and Celebrations

Year 5 Romans

Year 5 Anglo-Saxons

Year 5 Vikings

Year 6 WW2

Empire and Power

By learning about empire and power, children will develop an understanding of empires throughout history and their impact on where and how people have lived. This will encourage children to learn about and consider democracy, equality, government, law and poverty. They will also learn about the legacy left behind from previous empires.

Year R All About Me

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 5 Romans

Year 6 WW2

Civilisation

By learning about civilisations, children will develop an understanding of a range of ancient civilisations, unpicking why they were successful. By studying a range of ancient civilisations, children can compare their achievements for example in mathematics, government, trade, building and art. Similarly, children will be able to focus on their influence on today’s societies.

Year R Animals

Year R Space

Year 1 Dinosaurs

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 3 Stone Age to Iron Age

Year 4 Maya

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Year 6 WW2

Trade

By learning about trade, children will develop an understanding of how trade played a significant role throughout history, enabling communities, societies and civilisations to thrive. Children will learn how trade has evolved and changed throughout history, but is still happening in today’s world.

Year R Plants

Year 1 Toys

Year 4 Maya

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Year 6 Local Transport

 

Second Order Concepts (Historical Skills)

Below is a table of second order concepts that the children at Sandling Primary School focus upon in history and our reasoning behind their choice.

Second-order Concept

Why learn about this concept?

Year group and topic studied

Continuity and change

Continuity and change enables out children to recognise that over time some things stay the same, while others change. Examples of continuity and change can be seen across every civilisation and any given period of time. Many aspects of history influence how we act and live today. Change can occur within a certain civilisation or a specific time period, but also across different civilisations and time periods. ‘Change’ refers to something that is obviously different from what occurred previously. We believe our children should be taught to recognise change as being a key aspect of the past, identifying how this has shaped their present and learning from this when creating their own future - learning from past events to adapt.

Year R All About Me

Year 2 Castles

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 3 Stone Age to Iron Age

Year 5 Anglo-Saxons

Year 5 Vikings

Year 6 Transport

 

Cause and consequence

As we study historical events, our children will discover that things do not simply ‘happen’ without reason. Children will learn that historical events are caused by things that occurred before them. Also, that historical events create changes that have consequences long after the event is over. This is cause and consequence.

Year R Plants

Year 1 Polar Explorers

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 5 Romans

Similarity and difference

Similarity and difference helps out children to move beyond stereotypical assumptions about people in the past, and to recognise and analyse the diversity of past experience. While we want our children to have some degree of generalisation in making claims about the past, paying attention to the extent of similarity and difference between different sorts of people – and between people within the same group – is important in helping our children to appreciate the reality of past lives. Top of Form

 

Year R Festivals & Celebrations

Year R Superheroes

Year R Traditional Tales

Year 1 Toys

Year 1 Polar Explorers

Year 2 Castles

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 2 Shipwrecked

Year 3 Stone Age to Iron Age

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Year 6 WW2

Year 6 Transport

Significance

Historical significance is a decision that modern people make about what is important from our past. In assigning historical significance, we can choose specific events, people, locations and ideas as being particularly important to us.  Since significance is a decision that we make, it means that different people can decide that different things are significant, or that they can disagree about the reasons a particular person, event, place or idea is important.  Therefore, significance is not the same to everyone, or at all times in history. What we consider to be important can change. As a result, some events which were considered significant a century ago may not be important to us now. Alternatively, we may consider something historically significant today that no-one cared about a hundred years ago.

Year R Festivals & Celebrations

Year R Animals 

Year 1 Polar Explorers

Year 1 Dinosaurs

Year 2 Shipwrecked

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 4 Ancient Maya

Year 4 Ancient Egypt

Year 6 WW2

 

Chronology

Chronology contributes to children's sense of identity and helps them to create a context for understanding the present. In order to grasp and consider history, children need to establish in their own minds a chronology of events to enable them to make connections between them and see the wider implications of their studies in history. Children should understand at what point in the timeline they arrived and what has come before them. Understanding their past and how the past has shaped the present is something that we believe is key for our children. Also important is the understanding that many eras occurred at the same time or overlapped. The curriculum has been planned to allow the children to build their chronological understanding.

Year R All about me

Year R Superheroes

Year 1 Dinosaurs

Year 1 Toys

Year 2 Great Fire of London

Year 3 Ancient Greece

Year 5 Romans

Year 5 Anglo-Saxons

Year 5 Vikings

Year 6 WW2

 

Whole School Long Term Plan

Name
 History Long Term Plan.pdfDownload
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Year Group Medium Term Plans

Name
 Year 1
 Year 2
 Year 3
 Year 4
 Year 5
 Year 6
 Year R
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Progression in History

Name
 History Progression of concepts.pdfDownload
 History Progression of second-order concepts.pdfDownload
 History Progression of Vocabulary.pdfDownload
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